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Which knife sharpener is best?
#1


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#2
Note that he is using test clips so add 20% to his sharpness numbers. Test clips read 20% too sharp.

All of those contraptions are probably better than just never sharpening, especially the little Work Sharp. A few of them really chewed up the edge and no doubt left a burr mess.

The thing is that I think the average person would think that even a 300-400 toothy edge is probably good enough. As long as it's toothy even a 300-400 still slices pretty well.

Thanks for posting that Mr. Sharpco.
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#3
I coincidentally watched this yesterday and just saw this thread today.

I have to give him a A for effort in that he really tries to control his experiments. But I'm not sure he realizes that even a sharpening 'system' needs an operator who understands how it works in order to get good results. His results are decent, especially for slot gadgets.

Did you notice how the slot devices that use tungsten carbide produce lines that run down the edge lengthwise? These things really do a bad job on edges and kind of "tear the metal off", leaving behind that "ruts in a dirt road" look on the edge.

I've been told if you get a really high quality slot device, with the pieces set at the proper angle that you can get good results. Fred Rowe was making a very high precision slot device which had an angle adjustment on it for a while. Not sure if he's still selling it. It was called the ERU. The web site is still around, but there appear to be no links to purchase it.

http://edgeru.com/

Anyway, a somewhat interesting video. Thanks Grepper for the info about the clips. I did not know they read "20% too sharp".

Is it possible I'm getting false readings from pulling my test media too tight? I pull, wrap, and tighten with one hand, so I'm not trying to do anything crazy. Just trying to get the line taught and keep it that way with the thumb screw.

Brian.
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#4
I've got to agree with all that Brian.  Especially,

"Did you notice how the slot devices that use tungsten carbide produce lines that run down the edge lengthwise? These things really do a bad job on edges and kind of "tear the metal off", leaving behind that "ruts in a dirt road" look on the edge"

Ditto.  It really is a horrid way to "sharpen" a knife and tears up the blade.  I understand why folks use those things.  A 400 torn up edge cuts better than the typical 1,000 edge that are common in people's knife drawers.  

"Thanks Grepper for the info about the clips. I did not know they read 20% too sharp."

http://bessex.com/forum/showthread.php?t...51#pid5151

"Is it possible I'm getting false readings from pulling my test media too tight? I pull, wrap, and tighten with one hand, so I'm not trying to do anything crazy. Just trying to get the line taught and keep it that way with the thumb screw."

As long as considerable tension is not applied to the test media you are probably doing just fine. Basically just give it enough tension to remove the slack and tighten the hold down screw.  It's not all that sensitive and over-thinking it is not necessary.  

From: https://www.edgeonup.com/PT50%20Series_Manual_A_B_C.pdf

The goal here is to simply pull the test media across the gap in the fixture with no slack(slight tension)in the test media. Do not over tension the test media. Over tensioning is neither helpful nor necessary
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#5
Technique was lacking with the Worksharp. If you watch the video carefully he didn't keep the blade in contact with the 20 degree guide. Having said that, a good video.
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