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Sharpening scandi knife with belt grinder
#1
Many people here are doing sharpening with belt grinder. Do you sharpen scandi knife with a belt grinder?

I think using a belt will force the bevel to become convex. Somebody wouldn't like it.
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#2
If your belt grinder has a flat platen, it is quite easy to do.
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#3
IMHO, if you aren't using enough pressure to deflect the belt, most of the convexity must come from human error.

Also MHO, Scandi grinds are most likely designed to be sharpened on a stone.

Many people use a slight microbevel on Scandies too, probably because that's easily accomplished on a stone.
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#4
You have to have a lot more talent than I do to sharpen against the platen. That's not a very high bar though. I can't do it without making a mess of the bevel. I'm strictly above the platen.
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#5
(03-07-2019, 09:15 AM)ajoe Wrote: If your belt grinder has a flat platen, it is quite easy to do.

My Viel(fixed speed) has a flat platen, but it removes metal very fast and makes a lot of heat.
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#6
Mark. 

Also MHO, Scandi grinds are most likely designed to be sharpened on a stone.
>>> I agree. I think Tormek can be used. Also Mora recommend it in their F.A.Q. 

Many people use a slight microbevel on Scandies too, probably because that's easily accomplished on a stone.
>>> Mora said Scandi edge have to have microbevel because edge durability, and said only carving knives can be sharpen with zero Scandi edge. I make it with Spyderco Sharpmaker at 20 degrees per side.
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#7
(03-07-2019, 01:37 PM)Mike Brubacher Wrote: You have to have a lot more talent than I do to sharpen against the platen. That's not a very high bar though. I can't do it without making a mess of the bevel. I'm strictly above the platen.

Yes, It's hard to do on the platen. So I have a plan using jig or guide.
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#8
">>> I agree. I think Tormek can be used. Also Mora recommend it in their F.A.Q."

Maybe for the microbevel, but Tormek produces a hollow grindI doubt it would make any discernible difference in real-world use anymore than the possibility of an ever so slight convex grind that might happen with off the platen sharpening on a belt grinder.  
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#9
I wonder how much our idea of "hollow grind" is a product of our early learned memories. Like many of my generation, my hollow grind memories began with the typical six inch grinders. My grandfather had a 1930s vintage belt driven six inch grinder. I still have my motor driven belt grinder from 1972.

Would my concept of hollow grind be different if my memory was of a large foot powered sandstone wheel?

Ken
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