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First toothy edge
#1
   
I sharpen it with 240 grit belt. 

   
Then deburred with clean leather belt applied mineral oil only. I couldn't deburr completely. Is it LOW?

I got 200 BESS.
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#2
Mr. Sharpco,  Looks like you are getting good use from your new Celestron scope.

There may well be a toothy edge under there somewhere, but I think what you show is a good sized burr.  Push the edge against the edge of a table or something and then check it again.  If it's burr it will be smashed down where it hit the table.

That roll of crud at the base of the burr is the LOW that you have been wishing to see.  Compare your images to this:
http://bessex.com/forum/showthread.php?t...41#pid4341
Look familiar?

The actual edge is under that pile of metal, or wire edge, or base of the burr or LOW or whatever you wish to call it.

Take an sharp point like the tip of an Exacto knife and slide it straight up the side against of the blade against the bottom of the roll of metal at the edge and push.  I'm guessing that the LOW will be pried off the edge just like in the third image in the post that I linked to above.  

That wire edge or LOW crap can be pesky to remove whilst still maintaining a toothy edge.  It's easy if you don't mind a more polished edge as you can just use a fine abrasive. 

If you look carefully at the third image in the link above, you can see that pushing against the base of the burr pried the LOW off the edge and the large flimsy part of the burr has been pushed to the back side of the blade.  It is a bit dark, but you can see it.  It's all one piece of burr crud.  Flimsy on the top and the roll of metal or LOW at the bottom.   Prying the LOW off the edge takes the rest of the burr with it.

At any rate I think you have an excellent example of the LOW that you have been wanting to be able to see, so it looks like your new scope is performing well for you. Smile
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#3
grepper. 


I pushed the edge against the edge of the wood block but it wasn't be smashed down. 

I'm glad to see LOW, but from now the problem is how to remove it. I used a leather belt with no compound at all, but it didn't remove LOW.


BTW, is your image taken with a celestron scope? It looks much more magnified than my image.
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#4
Mr. Sharpco, I could always be mistaken about what I see in you images.  The first image in your post looks like the first image in the post I linked to.  That image still has the flimsy part of the burr.

The second image in your post looks like the second image in the post I linked to.  The second image was after the flimsy part of the burr was removed leaving only the LOW.  

I don't know how much deburring you did before you pressed the edge against the block.  If you had already removed the flimsy top part of the burr and only the LOW remained, then it might not get bashed in when pushed against the block.

If you read the post I linked to through to the end of the thread, there a several good suggestions on how to remove the LOW or wire edge or whatever you wish to call it. This is where you are going to have to experiment, use your microscope and find a method of burr removal that works for you.  

Use the tip of an Exacto knife and push up against the bottom of the LOW and watch it get pushed off the bevel.  Understand what that means.  Drag the blade, edge trailing against various surfaces like sandpaper, stones, Scotch-Brite, leather, wood, plastic, fine abrasives and compounds etc. and examine what effect that has under your microscope.  That's exactly what I did.

You deserve congratulations because you are now advancing into the finer points of sharpening.  Once you have advanced to this point, getting a full understanding deburring is going to take time, effort and experimenting on your part.  But, if you are serious about learning this stuff, the time spent and knowledge you will gain will be worth it!  

Folks babble endlessly about deburring in forums, but seemingly few seem to fully understand the issues and what is happening at the edge.  Understand what LOW is and how it is stuck to the edge.  Understand the difference between prying or scraping it off the edge and grinding it off using fine abrasives.  Learn how those two methods effect a toothy edge.  Use your microscope and edge tester and learn.  It is only by doing the work, experimenting, using your instruments and spending the time to do so that you will truly understand for yourself what all this means. Then you will really know and be able to prove it.  That's a lot different than taking somebody's word for it.
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#5
Excellent post, Grepper.

Ken
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#6
Thank you so much grepper. Smile
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#7
I say thanks to Sharpco and Grepper. Grepper and I kicked this can around for two years and it is amazing to me that you, Sharpco, have duplicated the problem precisely. I still say that Grepper  deserves the Nobel prize for burr removal in discovering that the LOW was attached to and part of the edge apex. This was accomplished with a microscope and an exacto knife. 

It's a mean critter this LOW. I actually failed to remove it with a wire wheel on a bench grinder. This, I believe, was due to the fact that the wires were unable to get beneath the LOW and lift it. Grepper did lift it with the exacto blade and very clearly so.  We know that a scotch brite belt will remove it and we don't understand, necessarily, why. The key is to remove it without diminishing sharpness. If you do it correctly, you'll drop from 150 to 100 and incorrectly, you'll add 30-50 points to your score. I say you're better off, edge retention wise, removing and losing ground than leaving it on but that's supposition on my part.

This is the kind of stuff that makes sharpeners better at their craft so great job Sharpco!
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#8
Thank you all. 

I had a curiosity about the toothy edge. But my customers don't particularly like it. Most people like shiny and sharp edges.(If they try it, their thoughts may change.)

So I think shiny toothy edge will be a good solution.  Wouldn't it be possible to make a micro toothy edge using a diamond abrasive? I'll try to remove the burr with Tormek honing compound and finish with diamond emulsion by hand stropping.
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#9
Whoa! Geez. Sorry I'm late to the party.

Seems like you gentlemen are only showing the One side of the blade that has the burr- with the flimsy burr still attached in the first pictures.

I didn't think the LOW was a burr with a clean leather finish, but I finish on stones, so it looks different to me.

If you gentlemen could please take pictures of both sides of the blade, just like you're taking pictures of one side, it will show what I mean.
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#10
(01-27-2019, 07:49 PM)Mark Reich Wrote: Whoa! Geez. Sorry I'm late to the party.

Seems like you gentlemen are only showing the One side of the blade that has the burr- with the flimsy burr still attached in the first pictures.

I didn't think the LOW was a burr with a clean leather finish, but I finish on stones, so it looks different to me.

If you gentlemen could please take pictures of both sides of the blade, just like you're taking pictures of one side, it will show what I mean.

Sorry, Mark. I already made it into polished edge. When I try to make the toothy edge again, I'll show you both side.
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