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Full Version: The burr can realign itself???
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https://www.dovo.com/en/ratgeber/take-care-of-straight-razors-strops-shaving-brushes/

"To remove leather residue and cut hair from your straight razor, rinse it with warm water. Now carefully dab the straight razor dry with a soft cloth. Please be careful not to touch the cutting edge. Otherwise, you could damage the microscopic burr at the cutting edge. We recommend that you store the straight razor in a well-ventilated place, as this is the best way to protect the metal from tarnishing or oxidation. Since the burr of the straight razor bends slightly during shaving, leave the straight razor to rest for 48 hours. During this time, the burr can realign itself. Rub the blade with an acid-free oil such as a camellia or paraffin oil if you’re not going to shave in near future."




https://www.barberscorner.de/en/blog/care-stropping-of-straight-razors

"The fiber of the linen is soft, the mesh of the textile, however, is rough. This allows the linen to grip the burr and align it. The weave of the textile catches dirt and loose steel particles which could damage the sensitive edge when pressed against the strop. The final use of the strop makes the resulting edge finer. You should strop the razor before, and not after shaving. Steel has a certain level of self-healing power, or “memory.” After stress, the burr slowly and partially stands itself up again. If you violently rip the burr up with the strop immediately after shaving, this stresses the material, which shortens the life expectancy of the burr and, in the long run, of the razor. The razor should rest for at least 24 hours after the shave – but 48 hours or more is ideal, so if you shave every day, you should own at least two straight razors. Our grandfathers therefore often had sets for the entire week, containing 7 razors."



How do you think about that?
Well, I know that if I don't get enough rest I'm not worth a crap.  Maybe straights are the same.

Steel does have "memory".  A spring is a great example.

I've never seen a blade get sharper after a good rest, but I have seen blades get duller:
http://bessex.com/forum/showthread.php?t...+overnight

That's not to say it couldn't happen.  I've just never experienced it myself, even though the idea of a self sharpening blade has it's appeal.  In my experience, neatly organized wires tend to become tangled, raspberries get moldy and and the general tendency of edges is entropic.