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4 BESS
#1


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#2
Wow! That's sharp! The sharpest I've seen posted here. Congrats. Did you take other measurements along the blade?

What was your sharpening procedure?
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#3
No, it's not my work. grepper. Smile
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#4
Thanks for posting this incredible low BESS score reading!

In my understanding the apex width shrunk into nano-scale region because they are some 40 iron atoms there only.

Was the BESS score measured immediately after sharpening to avoid oxidation processes?

Jan


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#5
Holy Smokes Sharpco! Thanks for posting the video. How about providing some details if you have them.
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#6
(08-12-2019, 12:51 PM)EOU Wrote: Holy Smokes Sharpco! Thanks for posting the video. How about providing some details if you have them.

BBB said...

"This is a single bevel Usuba in Kigami Yellow paper steel (nothing fancy). The Geometry is 10° inclusive  on primary blade grind, 12° inclusive on a microbevel with a 12,000 grit edge finish on a Naniwa super stone freehand.  0.003" behind the edge thickness at the microbevel shoulder. This knife is very delicate like a straight razor edge. This is not an ideal edge for all applications. Versatility can be increased with a Hamaguri edge but the Bess score would be higher."
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#7
That's what we call details Sharpco! Thank you. There might be  instruction found here for straight edge sharpeners;  a 12 degree inclusive sharpening angle and a measurement of BESS 4. If the edge had dented during the measurement process then the reading would not have been 4 but something on the order of 100 - 1,000. 

Our hat is off to BBB for engineering, by hand, an extremely sharp edge that seems to demonstrate a degree of useful utility as well.
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#8
I could be mistaken but ive had some readouts like this I believe to be from the same error. You can see the numbers going negative during the test, after the positive ones at the start but before the final result. This happens when the fixture is accidentally lifted, making it lighter than when the test started. The scale will show a negative symbol anytime there is a reading that's less than when the test began, the same as when you remove the test fixture to restring. However, when a positive pressure of equal or greater value is reapplied the symbol disappears. I think the blade made contact slightly on the side of the test media rather than directly from above, or the blade slided slightly, dragging the test media. The former can happen when the blade approaches on too steep of an angle like a guillotine, instead of the testing portion entering level. Either way, when the test media is cut askew, the horizontal pressure is not accounted for and the negative reading is not figured into the final number. Maybe it pinched the fixture sideways on the base relieving a few grams of it's original weight or part the blade was positioned low enough to very slightly raise it on its own.


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#9
Your observations and comments are very much appreciated BobD. We, and most of our customers, are well aware that there are several ways to affect the outcome of a measurement, both intentionally and sometimes, unintentionally. We always rely on the integrity of the measurement process when presented with evidence of extremely low readings and leave it at that. There is nothing to be learned and little gained by the individual sharpener who places a "thumb on the scale". In our experience, no matter the test material or instrument,  when exceptional results are noted, the test process is reviewed and the experiment repeated. 

In the case of the video posted by SHARPCO, we would say that whether the edge being tested was rightfully 4 or 24 - it was a darn sharp edge and an extremely skilled job of sharpening.
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#10
(08-14-2019, 10:23 AM)EOU Wrote: In the case of the video posted by SHARPCO, we would say that whether the edge being tested was rightfully 4 or 24 - it was a darn sharp edge and an extremely skilled job of sharpening.

I've got to agree with that!  At first I thought sharpening to 100 was amazing.  Now it seems to be commonplace.  Then I thought 50 was amazing, but some of our members achieve that on a regular basis.  Now we see 4.  I guess I should not be surprised considering the progression, but still, as EOU said, "4 or 24 - it was a darn sharp edge and an extremely skilled job of sharpening."

Four or 24 is amazing.  Add to that it was supposedly hand sharpened and it's even more impressive. 

Is EOU going to have to develop testers accurate to .001 grams so that these edges can be differentiated from each other?
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