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I recently did some testing of CBN grinding wheels with the Tormek. Specifically, I wanted to see if using a 180 grit CBN wheel would make the slow speed Tormek, an excellent tool for resharpening, into an efficient reshaping grinder. Short answer: in my opinion, it does. Minor reshaping is accomplished in only a couple minutes; a major reshaping test I did required a few minutes more. The CBN wheel did not glaze and cut efficiently throughout the testing.

The focus here is BESS. In later testing, I compared the edges of 80 and 180 grits with a spindle gouge. I also compared BESS readings for the same gouge sharpened with the wheel turning into the tool and trailing (turning away from the tool).

Especially with the 80 grit, there was quite a burr. BESS was close to 500. However, with just a visit with the leather honing wheel, BESS cleaned up to 130. I prefer the conventional Tormek SG grinding wheel for smooth sharpening, however, the quickly obtained 130 is not too shabby.

BESS gave me a very quick practical sharpness measurement, and one which would be understood by sharpeners anywhere. I find it a very useful tool.

Ken
Sir

When reshaping a kitchen knife using a Tormek, use the Tormek wheel after being "trued" with the Tormek diamond wheel dresser (TT 50 truing tool) - do not use the Tormek SP 650 Stone Grader for reshaping at this time you want the aggressive grit.

This give the Tormek user a choice of (3) grit grades.

My opinion - works for me.

Rupert
I have to agree with you Rupert.  Right after the wheel is trued it is very aggressive, and even considering the slow speed of the grinding wheel, it is capable of hogging off a lot of metal very quickly.  So much so that when sharpening a small blade like a pocket knife, you have to be careful not turn the blade into a toothpick.  

Interestingly, the Tormek is not limited to just 3 grits.  For instance, if the stone grader is used to make the wheel as smooth as can be, according to Tormek it’s around 1,000 grit.  Actually I have the feeling that it is really more aggressive than 1,000 grit, but I digress.  

If you then start using the rough side of the stone grader, you don’t have to make the grinding wheel as rough as possible.  You could, for instance, stop about half way between totally smooth and totally rough.  In theory that would be about 500 grit.

Obviously this is not a precise science.  To figure it out, you can get various grits of sandpaper to compare it to.  That at least gives your some idea.

Every Tormek user knows from experience that if you grade the wheel to as rough as you can get it, as you sharpen the wheel gets smoother and you have to use the stone grader again to maintain the aggressive grit level.  So, in a way, every Tormek user has experienced using the grinding wheel at varying grit levels.  Not totally smooth and not totally rough.
Good point, Rupert.

The Tormek is an excellent tool for sharpening. That is its primary function. Within limits, it can be used for reshaping. You are correct that the coarsest grit is obtained directly after using the TT-50 Truing Tool. In fact, even this process can be varied. Usually the diamond is fed very slowly, taking two minutes to traverse the stone. This produces the smoothest surface. If the traverse time is sped up to thirty seconds, this will produce a coarser surface. 

Some suggestions for using the trying tool:
1) Think of the grinding wheel like brake shoes, as something designed to be consumed. It will last a very long time, however, it is designed to be used and consumed. Let it do its job well by sacrificing a tiny bit frequently through retruing. By retruing frequently (and lightly) you will avoid many sharpening gremlins.

2) Start with very light passes. I prefer to make several very light passes wuth the truing tool, usually half a number on the microadjust knob. I have occasionally made more aggressive passes when needed, however, I prefer the quieter, gentler approach of light passes. I like to sense how far out of true my wheel has become. I think of the wheel condition as a graph. The top of the graph is optimum. As the wheel is used, the line lowers until the wheel should not be used. By using the truing tool frequently for light touch up, we keep the line closer to optimum. Sharpening is just better.

3) With focused practice, retruing takes little time. It is one of the essential skill of using a Tormek.

Keep posting.

Ken

ps Do not forget to tighten the locking screw and make sure you use enough water to keep the grinding surface wet. As I have done both in the past, it is possible that others might, also. Sad
(03-16-2017, 04:27 AM)Ken S Wrote: [ -> ]Good point, Rupert.

The Tormek is an excellent tool for sharpening. That is its primary function. Within limits, it can be used for reshaping. You are correct that the coarsest grit is obtained directly after using the TT-50 Truing Tool. In fact, even this process can be varied. Usually the diamond is fed very slowly, taking two minutes to traverse the stone. This produces the smoothest surface. If the traverse time is sped up to thirty seconds, this will produce a coarser surface. 

Some suggestions for using the trying tool:
1) Think of the grinding wheel like brake shoes, as something designed to be consumed. It will last a very long time, however, it is designed to be used and consumed. Let it do its job well by sacrificing a tiny bit frequently through retruing. By retruing frequently (and lightly) you will avoid many sharpening gremlins.

2) Start with very light passes. I prefer to make several very light passes wuth the truing tool, usually half a number on the microadjust knob. I have occasionally made more aggressive passes when needed, however, I prefer the quieter, gentler approach of light passes. I like to sense how far out of true my wheel has become. I think of the wheel condition as a graph. The top of the graph is optimum. As the wheel is used, the line lowers until the wheel should not be used. By using the truing tool frequently for light touch up, we keep the line closer to optimum. Sharpening is just better.

3) With focused practice, retruing takes little time. It is one of the essential skill of using a Tormek.

Keep posting.

Ken

ps Do not forget to tighten the locking screw and make sure you use enough water to keep the grinding surface wet. As I have done both in the past, it is possible that others might, also. Sad

Rupert,  purchased his first Tormek somewhere in the 1990's, Rupert's second machine was a gift from Don in NW Arkansas (Don, went with belts sand etc) and Rupert's third machine gifted from son Henry - said three machines have been updated to T-7's other than paint.

If for any reason I should need and or want another Tormek there is a knife maker in Central West South Dakota that would gift me his new T 7 never opened and/or used (5/6 years since purchase).

Thanks, to both of you two posters I am still learning at 85years of age.

To close, I have never used my Tormeks for anything other than kitchen, utility and pocket knives.

Never turned any knife into a "tooth pick" and hope to never damage a knife.

Rupert
Rupert,

I apologize if my last reply seemed patronizing. That was certainly not my intention. 

You have correctly noticed the ability of the truing tool to provide a coarser grit. I did not mean to imply that you were inexperienced with the Tormek or the truing tool. However, i suspect that many of the readers may not have your experience. I have encountered many Tormek users who are reluctant or afraid to use the truing tool. I was that way I was for an embarrassing amount of time. I hope in my posting to spare some of our readers from the pot holes which have impaired me.

Ken
(03-16-2017, 08:26 AM)Ken S Wrote: [ -> ]Rupert,

I apologize if my last reply seemed patronizing. That was certainly not my intention. 

You have correctly noticed the ability of the truing tool to provide a coarser grit. I did not mean to imply that you were inexperienced with the Tormek or the truing tool. However, i suspect that many of the readers may not have your experience. I have encountered many Tormek users who are reluctant or afraid to use the truing tool. I was that way I was for an embarrassing amount of time. I hope in my posting to spare some of our readers from the pot holes which have impaired me.

Ken

Gentlemen, I can promise you that no offense was taken so apologies are not required. I enjoy this forum very much so you don't have to worry about hurting my feelings.

As always with regards

Rupert
Rupert,

Through your experience, you realize the utility of using more than one Tormek. I do not believe even Tormek marketing has become fully aware of this potential.

Ken
Ken
Using more than one Tormek is for sure the way to go when you are fortunate (gifts and etc) enough to add additional Tormeks to your work bench for sharpening knives - I have never done woodworking tools other than carving knives.

There is a sharpener over in the Virginia Beach, VA area that sharpens hi end (?) knives that went into a Tormek dealer to purchase the T 8 and the said sharpener was told something in ref that the Tormek was not for him (?).

Talking (telephone) to Mr. Tuffy Braithwaite (Maxtheknife) last evening who knows the said sharpener - my suggestion was to put Ken S, grepper and said sharpener in contact.

Tuffy may be a registered member of this forum?

Rupert
Rupert,

Please check your forum messages. I sent you an email.

Ken

Rupert,

I own T7, T4, and T8 Tormeks. In my opinion, all are excellent tools for knife sharpening.

Ken
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